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Title:
A Short History of Nearly Everything
Written by:
Bill Bryson 
Read by:
William Roberts 
Format:
Unabridged CD Audio Book 
Number of CDs:
16 
Duration:
19 hours 1 minutes 
Published:
October 28 2016 
Available Date:
October 28 2016 
Age Category:
Adult 
ISBN:
9781486283972 
Genres:
Non-fiction; History 
Publisher:
Bolinda/Audible audio 
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AUD$ 49.95
AUD$ 49.95
 

'To [listen to] Bryson is to travel with a memoirist gifted with wry observation and keen insight that shed new light on things we mistake for commonplace. To accompany the author as he travels with the likes of Charles Darwin on the Beagle, Albert Einstein or Isaac Newton is a trip worth taking.'
Publishers Weekly

Featuring a special introduction written for the audiobook edition and read by the author.

A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson's fascinating and humorous quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilisation. He takes subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry, and particle physics, and aims to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. In the company of some extraordinary scientists, Bill Bryson reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

'Stylish [and] stunningly accurate prose ... Brims with strange and amazing facts ... destined to become a modern classic of science writing.'
The New York Times

'Mr Bryson has a natural gift for clear and vivid expression. I doubt that a better book for the layman about the findings of modern science has been written.'
The Sunday Telegraph

'The very book I have been looking for most of my life ... Bryson wears his knowledge with aplomb and a lot of very good jokes.'
The Daily Mail