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The Last Convict (MP3)
Released the same day as the standard print edition
Title:
The Last Convict (MP3)
Written by:
Anthony Hill 
Read by:
Julian Garner 
Format:
Unabridged MP3 CD Audio Book 
Number of CDs:
Duration:
9 hours 30 minutes 
MP3 size:
411 MB 
Published:
February 02 2021 
Available Date:
February 02 2021 
Age Category:
Adult 
ISBN:
9780655671770 
Genres:
Fiction; Crime & Thriller; General Fiction; Historical Fiction 
Publisher:
Bolinda/Penguin Audio Australia 
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Format
Price
Bolinda price
NZD$ 44.95
NZD$ 44.95
 

#1 bestselling author

A moving and insightful audiobook about the life and times of Samuel Speed, believed to be the last of the transported convicts to die in Australia, and a vivid recreation of life in Australia’s penal era by the bestselling author of Soldier Boy.

‘It’s a good story, Samuel. You’re a piece of living history.’ Oxford 1863: Young Samuel Speed sets a barley stack alight in the hope it will earn him a bed in prison for the night. He wants nothing more than a morsel of food in his belly and a warm place to sleep off the streets. What he receives is a sentence of seven years’ servitude, to be served half a world away in the penal colony of Fremantle, Western Australia. When Samuel boards the transport ship Belgravia, he is stripped of his clothing and even his name, and given regulations of when to rise, eat, clean and sleep. On arrival at Fremantle Prison, hard labour is added to the mix and he wonders if life can get any worse. The only solace he finds is a love of reading, which allows the likes of Tom Sawyer and Oliver Twist to become his lifelong friends. Samuel is granted a ticket of leave in 1867 and full freedom in 1871, but what sort of life can a man forge for himself in the colony, with no skills, no money and no family? Will it be the beginning of the life he has always dreamed of, or do some sentences truly never end?